Tag Archives: Everest Base Camp

From Temper to Trees – Nepal – Chapter 16

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Gorak Shep (5160m) – Kala Pattar (5550m) – Lobuche (4910m) – Pangboche (3980m)

 Date = 30-31 March

 L&D get out of bed reluctantly.  It’s minus 5°C indoors and snowing outside.  Angtu has booked breakfast for 6.30am.  They’ve got a 400 metre climb to the top of Kala Pattar.

They inspect the sky, which does not look promising.

D:  I really want to climb the mountain.

L:  I don’t seem to mind if we do or not.

D:  I want to see if it clears at all.  If it does I’m going up.

L:  OK, if it does, I’ll come too.

There is a French boy at the next table.  Despite the fact that it’s still only 7am, he says he’s already been to the top and back this morning.

D:  How was it?

Boy:  It was super-cold and not worth it as there was nothing to see.

D:  I think it’s clearing.  The sky’s lightening.  It’s stopped snowing.

Boy:  That’s so not fair!

L:  (joking)  You’ll have to do it again!

P1030397 (2)They leave him to his breakfast and set off.  There’s a thin crust of snow, a bitter wind and a leaden grey sky which is slowly shifting and cracking.  Without the sun the landscape is monochrome and harsh.  There is rock and snow.  Black and white.  Cold and colder.

A helicopter thuds up the valley.  It lands in a snowfield below them.  Three tourists get out, take photos of Mount Everest, get back in, and fly away.

The path up Kala Pattar is clear and unchallenging but steep, until the last 50m of bare rock.  It seems that at 5,500 metres L has reached her temper threshold.  D&L stand just below the summit and bicker.  Angtu looks uncomfortable and pretends he can’t hear.

L:  You go. I don’t even care about getting to the top.

D:  But I want you to be with me.

L:  I can’t breathe.  I’m too cold.

D:  Come with me.

L:  I don’t want to.

D goes ahead on his own and reaches the summit.   L comes slower.  D is delighted.  L couldn’t care less, although through her sulk she recognises that on a clear day the views would be unequalled.  Just behind them, looking close enough to touch, towers the peak of Pumori.  Below them lies Everest Base Camp, and the Khumbu Icefall, and beyond the glacier soars Everest – today glimpsed only fleetingly through the shifting cloud.

P1030423 (2)D:  It’s amazing!  Take photos of everything!

L:  I can’t.  My hands are numb.

She hands the camera to Angtu.

D:  Here – have a celebratory Snickers!  We’re at 5550m!  The highest we’ve ever been!

L:  It’s too cold.  Let’s just go.  Let’s celebrate later – somewhere warm.

D:  Oh.  OK.

L:  Have I ruined it?

D:  A little bit.

L:  It’s just so cold.  And grey.  And cold.

They start down.  L’s mood and fingers thaw a fraction.

L:  Sorry.  I think it’s the altitude.  Now we’re a bit lower, I’m less horrible already.

But she continues to feel negative all the way down.  Bad vibes are streaming out of her.  She’s worried the mountain will feel her antipathy and be offended and cause her to strain a knee or an ankle or fall.  For an hour she mutters “thank you Kala Pattar, thank you Kala Pattar” over and over under her breath, a mantra of gratitude to drown out the rest.

On the descent they are overtaken by a youth, skipping down the mountain.  It’s the French boy, who has summitted a second time that morning, and this time been rewarded with views.  L is pleased for him, and continues her muttering.  “Thank you Kala Pattar, thank you Kala Pattar”.

They arrive back at the warmth of the lodge in Gorak Shep and drink hot chocolate and eat pancakes.  It’s taken nearly 2 hours up, and just over 1 hour down.  D is glowing with a sense of achievement.  L feels nothing – she’s just been for a brutally cold walk and come back again.

P1030431 (2)They set off back to Lobuche.  Without the sun to melt the dusting of snow, the landscape stays monochrome and the windchill is biting.  Once again they across the chaotic maze of glacial moraine.

L:  What’s the most overpriced thing you’ve come across up here?  Bearing in mind that everything’s justified somewhere this remote.

D:  It could be the 4 dollar Kit Kat?

L:  Yes.

D:  Or the 400 dollar horse – for a day’s hire?

L:  Also yes.  One could surely buy a horse for less than that.

They join the wide, dusty, well-trodden corridor of the main trail and stride onwards and downwards.

L:  I think being at altitude might be good practice for extreme old age.  I imagine it’s just the same.

D:  In what way?

L:  Walking everywhere really slowly, with sticks.

D:  OK.

L:  And being always out of breath.

D:  I suppose.

L:  And needing to pee all the time.

D:  I think that’s pregnant people, not old ones.

L:  And not enough personal hygiene.

D:  That’s not old people or pregnant ones.  That’s just us.  I’m not sure this analogy is working.

L:  Oh.  You could be right.

D:  How long ago did we shower?

L:  Does a bucket of warm water attached to a hose count?

D:  Yes.

L:  10 days.

D:  And wash our hair?

L:  Two weeks.

D:  Nice.

L:  Quite.

***

It’s minus 4°C in their bedroom this morning, but outside the sky is clear.

P1030438 (2)A team of yaks, heavily laden with equipment for Everest Base Camp, drink from Lobuche’s stream.  A helicopter lands outside the lodge, throwing up a mini blizzard of fine snow which sparkles in the bright sun.

L is cheerful at the prospect that later today she will have a hot shower.  They have splashed out a shamefully enormous sum for a night of luxury tonight and she’s looking forward to washing two weeks of dirt from her hair.

The blue sky above adds welcome colour to the rock and snow of their surroundings.  As the valley widens, the horizon opens to display a succession of jagged distant peaks, and closer to, in the foreground is a similar series of turrets and pyramids, standing a couple of metres high.  They are spread out across the snow-encrusted plateau, with prayer-flags flying from one to another.  It’s a memorial field to climbers lost on Everest and elsewhere.  Many names are Sherpa, others are from all over the world, and they include some of the biggest and most respected names in mountaineering.

P1030449 (2)Among them is Scott Fischer, the American mountaineer and guide known for ascending the world’s highest peaks without extra oxygen.  In May 1996 he led a group of clients up Everest, assisted by two other guides.  After helping others, he summitted Everest late in the day and during his descent was caught in a violent blizzard that took the lives of 8 people, including Fischer.   In this spot there is also a memorial to Anatoli Boukreev, a respected Russian Kazakhstani climber and one of Fischer’s fellow guides on that day.  After rescuing others, Boukreev did manage to reach Fischer, but he was already dead.  Boukreev survived, but was killed in an avalanche while climbing Annapurna 18 months later.    One of the largest memorials is to Babu Chiri Sherpa, who climbed Everest 10 times, holding the record for the fastest ascent (under 17 hours), and for the most time on the summit without auxiliary oxygen (21 hours), as well as summitting twice in two weeks.  He died on his 11th summit bid of Everest, falling into a deep crevasse in April 2001.

P1030459 (4)From the memorial field, the trail descends through rock-strewn mayhem to the valley floor.  The clouds build, settling on the peaks and draping everything in grey.  The temperature drops.  Porters toil their way up through the boulders under enormous weights bound for Base Camp.  Angtu leads L carefully across an ice-bridge spanning the river, the pair of them slipping and dancing in unison, holding opposite ends of a walking pole.

The broad flat valley floor stretches on forever.  They glimpse the tin roofs of Pheriche at the far end of the plain, but the village remains resolutely distant.   They are now at around 4,300 metres.

L:  Look – juniper!  Actual alive growing things!

They realise that it’s been 10 days or more since they’ve seen a plant higher than a centimetre.

L:  And people living their lives!  Not just looking after trekkers.

They are passing tiny stone cottages, used only seasonally and empty this early in the year, and a patchwork of stone-walled yak paddocks.  A stream runs through the valley and the peak of Ama Dablam soars overhead.  In the sunshine it would be stunning.

In Pheriche they pause in a large lodge to rest and get warm whilst Angtu books rooms for a future group.  On their way out of the village, they spot their kit bag sitting on a wall, and from the interior of a dark tin hut comes a peal of laughter and a quack-quack-quack.  Phurba has found some friends.

P1030470 (2)Over a rise they look down into the next valley, a steep-sided groove cut by a fast-flowing river.  As they drop lower, the vegetation gets taller.

L:  No way!  Real trees!

She points.  On the opposite side of the valley, the hillside is cloaked in woodland.

D:  Oh – how we’ve missed them!

L:  Look how lovely they are.  Even though they’re not in leaf.

The tiny village of Shomare is a cluster of proper homes.  There are hens and little veg plots.  They stop for lunch in one of the only lodges.  The dining room is beautifully draped in wall hangings and the floor is spotlessly swept.  Outside the window a tiny girl toddler stands on a narrow ledge.  She puts her head through the open window and roars like a lion.  Then laughs.  She tries to climb in through the window, gives up and disappears.  P1030476 (2)She potters through the door curtain and climbs up onto the bench next to L.  They stare at each other for a bit.  She puts her face right up to L’s, and laughs.  She pokes L.  L smiles and pokes her gently back.  She giggles and pokes.  And giggles and pokes.  And giggles.  The soup arrives.  Her mother shoos her off the bench.  The little girl tries to climb out of the window, gives up and disappears back through the curtain.  She makes herself busy in the yard throwing cups of water at hens.

The onward path is narrow, high above the river.  They’ve not got far to go, and so amble leisurely behind a train of yaks.  A man scrambles up the bank from the river, hauling a sack of hay.

Man to Angtu:  It’s my mule.  He fell.

They peer over the edge.  On a faint trail 15 metres below them stands a brown mule.  He seems miraculously unharmed by his fall.   Two boys try unsuccessfully to pull and push the animal back up to the trail.  But the mule has had quite enough excitement for one day.  He’s going nowhere.

Pangboche is big and spread out.  There’s the first bit they come to, the bit round the corner, and the bit up the hill.  Their luxury lodge is in the first of these.  The extortionate price buys them a warm welcome with a hot towel, a cup of tea and a large slice of chocolate cake.  After the last fortnight, it’s paid for itself right there.  The room is surprisingly cold, despite the fact that they’ve dipped down to just below 4,000m, and the quality is of European 2-star level.  But it’s easy to forget that this village is still a week’s walk from the nearest drivable track.  It has comfortable beds and proper bedclothes.

P1030501 (2)Lodge:  The hot water bottles are free.  Would you like some?

L:  Fantastic – yes please.

Lodge:  Great.  How many?

L:  Oh – umm….

Lodge:  As many as you like.

L:  I think three.

Their en-suite bathroom has hot running water.  They launder some essentials and then lower the tone by hanging them up to dry in the corridor window.   The loo is all their own.  The gas powered shower is weak and fills the room with noxious fumes but the water is scaldingly hot and doesn’t run out and they both wash from top to toe, thoroughly.

L:  It’s so wonderful to be clean.

D:  Though our clothes still smell.

L:  Who cares?

Angtu urges them not to waste yet more money on forty dollar meals in the hotel so they follow him to the lodge opposite.  D is feeling queasy from the gas fumes.  L orders a cheese & tomato pizza.  Angtu returns from the kitchen.

Angtu:  They have no tomato.  You could have just cheese.

L:  A cheese pizza would be great, thank you.

The pizza arrives.  The kitchen have decided that just cheese won’t do.  They have compensated for the lack of tomato, with alternatives.

D:  What’s on your pizza?  That’s not just cheese.

L:  No.  There’s cheese…and carrot…and cabbage.

D:  Good luck with that!

He smirks and tucks into his dal bhat, though the gas has dulled his appetite.  L is hungry and starts on her pizza.

D:  How are you doing?

L:  It’s OK.  But it’s not right.  It’s great to eat cabbage and carrots, and it’s great to eat pizza, but combining the two should be illegal.

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Awesomest Everest – Nepal – Chapter 15

 

P1030273 (2)Gorak Shep (5160m) – Everest Base Camp (5364m) – Gorak Shep (5160m)

Date = 29 March

There are two inches of snow on the ground when D&L set off from Gorak Shep for Everest Base Camp, but the going is easy.  They wend their way gently up the edge of the Khumbu glacier, the rock and dust beneath their feet covered in clean crunchy snow.  The temperature is minus 6°C but the sky is blue and clear, and the sun is warm on their faces.  On every horizon white peaks soar skywards.  They share the path with few porters and Nepali expedition staff heading for Base Camp, but almost no other trekkers.

The guidebook is unenthusiastic about today’s walk.

“Many people have unrealistic expectations of Base Camp and end up being disappointed….there are no views of Everest…and cloud often rolls down from the peaks, obscuring everything in a grey fog.  The main reason to go there is to say you have been there.”

P1030258 (2)Instead of starting from Gorak Shep, most guided groups walk for 3 hours from Lobuche, pausing for an early lunch in Gorak Shep before arriving at Everest Base Camp in the early afternoon, and then heading back to Gorak Shep for the night.  It saves a day, keeps costs down and reduces the time spent at over 5000m.

L:  But it means they’ve walked for 5 hours to get to Base Camp, instead of 2.  So everyone’s exhausted.

D:  True.

L:  And they’ve gained 450 metres in altitude instead of 200.  So they’re probably not feeling so great.

D:  Also true.

L:  And they’ll get to get to Base Camp in the afternoon, after the clouds have built up.  So they might not see anything.

D:  You’re right.  I agree with the guide book.  Could be a pretty rubbish sort of day.

P1030343 (2)They descend onto the Khumbu glacier at around 10am – the landscape a heavy rolling sea of snow-sprinkled rock-strewn peaks and troughs.  Ahead a train of yaks weaves its way calmly through the chaos.  The path leads them to a small hillock strewn with prayer flags.  They are approached by a tall bearded man speaking heavy accented English with some difficulty.   D&L they recognise the accent and switch helpfully into Italian.

Man:  Ahh!  You are Italian!

D:  No, we’re English.

Man:  But you speak Italian!

D:  Yes.

Man:  Fantastic!  So where is the Base Camp?

They confer with Angtu in English.

D:  Umm…here, sort of.

Man:  But where is the sign?

They confer again with Angtu.

D:  Err..there is no sign.

Man:  But for my photos. I must have a sign!

They explain to Angtu.  The Italian has seen pictures of trekkers posing triumphantly in front of a big yellow sign.  And a huge engraved boulder.  Angtu shrugs and walks away.

Man:  So why d’you speak Italian?

D:  We have a house in Italy.

Man:  Oh!  Where in Italy?

D:  Abruzzo.

This is usually the end of the conversation.  The relatively unknown region of Abruzzo in central Italy is not on most people’s radar.  Except, it seems, for today.

Man:  No!  It can’t be true.  I come from Abruzzo!  Where in Abruzzo?

D:  The Majella National Park.

Now they will lose him.  Almost no-one lives in the beautiful mountains of the Majella, with its harsh winters and lack of jobs.  He will live on the coast, in the region’s capital maybe.  But no, it seems, he does not.  He spreads his arms wide.

Man:  Aah!  It’s not possible!  I come from the Majella!

P1030282 (4)They grin at each other stupidly in disbelief.  Angtu returns and leads them over to the pile of stones and prayer flags, where he has dusted the snow off a couple of small rocks on which people have written EBC and the date, in crayon.  It’s good enough for the Italian.  He gets out his camera phone and then delves once more into his rucksack, bringing out a fist-sized rock on which is written “Majella – Abruzzo – Italy”

Man:  Look!  I brought this here!  To Everest Base Camp!  All the way from the Majella!  From my mountain!  He places it reverently on top of stony pile and photographs it proudly.

L:  That’s some dedication.  You’re going to make me cry!

He hugs her.

Man:  I’m crying a bit too!

They leave him taking hundreds of photos of himself and his trek mates, accessorised with Italian T-shirts, hats and flags.  At this point most trekkers stop, take a few selfies, and then retrace their steps.  But the expedition tents for those attempting to summit Everest are spread out along the rocky glacier for a mile or so beyond them.  L wants to see more.

L:  Angtu?  Can we go on?  Up to where the tents are?

Angtu:  This way.

P1030302 (2)He leads them on through Base Camp.  On their left, Nepali expedition teams are clearing rocks and carving flat platforms in the ice on which to set up tents.  Clusters of tents are already in place, and set apart from the rest are tiny latrine huts balancing on pedestals of ice or rock – a loo seat suspended over a plastic drum.  Beside them, sculptural shards of ice thrust upwards through the debris.   On their right flows the Khumbu Icefall – close enough to touch and unfathomably huge.  Tumbling steeply down from the Western Cwm is a kilometre wide torrent of dazzling house-sized blocks of ice.  It’s on the move, flowing at the rate of about a metre a day, constantly shifting and collapsing, opening yawning new crevasses.  It’s beautiful and terrifying.   Helicopters skim along the glacier, over the camp and back again, providing photo opportunities for non-trekking tourists.  The Icefall is so enormous that the little aircraft dip down behind it, lost to sight from where D&L are standing.

A man emerges from a tent and shouts to Angtu.

L:  Are we in trouble?  What’s he saying?

Angtu:  He’s asking if we’d like some tea.

It’s warm inside the expedition kitchen tent despite the smooth ice floor.  Folding tables support large thermoses and cauldrons.  Soup is warming on a kerosene stove and a tower of egg boxes stands in a corner.  They perch on folding stools, sipping peach tea out of tin mugs and happily pretending they are part of an Everest ascent team.

On the return to Gorak Shep, the trail is now bustling with traffic heading up to Base Camp.   Bunches of slow-moving trekkers, strings of high-piled head-swinging yaks, and porters bent double under the weight on their backs.  A mountain of mattresses walks by.  There’s a guy with a half dozen long steel and wood folding tables.  They step aside for a man carrying a large fridge, and for another with a full size cooker.  One porter has 4 x 15kg gas bottles on his back.  Another is entirely buried under an immense roll of carpet.

P1030278 (2)D:  Base Camp was so clean.  I thought Everest was notorious for being strewn with rubbish.  But it was entirely litter-free.

Angtu:  Base Camp is managed by the SPCC – the National Park pollution control guys.  They do a good job.  But higher on the mountain it’s a different story.

D:  In what way?

Angtu:  The SPCC clear up all the rubbish as far as Camp 2, at 6,600 metres, above the Icefall and the Western Cwm.  They supply the Icefall Doctors too.

D:  The Icefall Doctors?

Angtu:  The guys who fix all the ladders through the Icefall at the start of each season.  They pick the safest route and put maybe 50 or more ladders across the crevasses.  So the climbers can get through it.

D:  Sounds dangerous.

Angtu:  It is.  Very dangerous.  Those guys are the real experts.

L:  It’s impressive that the SPCC are keeping the mountain clean all the way up to 6,600 metres.  That’s some seriously extreme litter picking!  Miyolangsangma, goddess protector of Everest, must be happy.

Angtu:  No.  I think she must be very sad.

L:  But why?

Angtu:  Further up – above Camp 2 – it gets bad.  Very bad.  Climbing teams leave a lot of rubbish in the higher camps.  Equipment, oxygen bottles, ladders, food wrappers and a lot of toilet waste.   Even branded stuff like tents – they just cut their company name off and leave it up there.

D:  But don’t they pay a big garbage deposit which they’d lose?

L:  Think about it.  The deposit’s probably been charged to the client, who won’t be expecting it back.  And if it’s easier for the companies to leave stuff up there and not reclaim the deposit, they exert minimum effort and lose nothing.  The next client’s fees probably pays for all new equipment.

Angtu:  There are supposed to be exit checks.  Counting the equipment going up and coming back down.  To make sure all waste is removed from the mountain, and so they can return the garbage deposits.  But the exit checks aren’t done.

D:  Isn’t every expedition member also supposed to bring 8kg of extra waste down with them?

Angtu:  Yes.  But again – no-one’s checking.

L:  That’s so sad.  It shouldn’t need to be about checking – it’s about respect and common sense.  The companies who come every year are quite literally crapping on their own doorsteps.  It’s ludicrous!  And the clients – how can they spend months in this most awesomest of landscapes and then have so little respect for it as to leave waste behind?  What’s happened to basic human conscience?

D:  You’re really shouting now.

Angtu:  It’s different up there.  The priority is to stay alive.  Get to the summit.  Get down again.  And come home.   It’s a problem.

D:  And I’m not sure “awesomest” is even a word.  Though it should be.

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A Dangerous Gamble with AMS (Acute Mountain Sickness) – Nepal – Chapter 14

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Italian Pyramid (4970m) – Gorak Shep (5160m)

28 March

 Angtu:  Everest Base Camp!

D&L have been walking, under an intense blue sky, across high meadow plateaus with open views.  Now they stop and follow Angtu’s gaze to where the distant rubble river of glacier becomes an immense strip of blue-white ice.  This is the Khumbu Icefall, and at its edge are the infinitesimally tiny yellow flecks of tents at Everest Base Camp.  From this viewpoint they have the world at their feet, and all to themselves.  100 metres or so below them is the busy main trekking trail, a rocky ribbon of dust on the valley floor pinched between the foot of the hill and a wall of glacial moraine.  But up here there is no-one – just sunshine, solitude and stupendous Himalayan peaks.  It is soul-singing stuff.

P1030237 (2)The bliss ends abruptly as their route converges with the main path at a junction of two glaciers.  The meeting point is a monumental mess of rubble and rocks and boulders.  It’s less than a kilometre across the glacier to Gorak Shep on the far side, but it takes them an hour.  The dusty, stony trail weaves and undulates through the maze.  Every step is uneven, the ground loose, and dust rises to coat their faces.  New paths are forged as old ones fall away, crushed by slabs of dirty grey ice and dragged underground by slow-moving debris.

Finally, the blue tin roofs of Gorak Shep appear below them, on the shore of a dry sand lake on which yaks lie resting like clumps of driftwood.  At 5,160m, Gorak Shep provides the highest altitude accommodation on earth.  Most trekkers spend one night only here, warned by guide books that they are unlikely to sleep soundly due to the altitude and the cold.  D&L are in no rush and are well acclimatized – they are here for two nights.   The settlement is scruffy and has the tough frontier feel of a place with purpose but no community.  No-one lives here year-round.

Angtu has set them some homework.

Angtu:  We are really high now.  Over 5000 metres.  You may get sick.  Not sleep well.  This afternoon, you must walk at least 100m higher than here, to help you acclimatise.

They promise to do their homework and Angtu heads off to find Phurba who has been banished to the village Porters’ Lodge, despite L&D’s protestations.

Angtu:  All the porters have to sleep there.  The lodges aren’t allowed to give them a room.

D&L cross the sand-lake desert.  A man is galloping to and fro on a palomino pony.  It feels more wild-west than ever.  On the far side, at the foot of a steep slope, people are gathering water trickling slowly from a spring.  Up here clean water is a hard earned resource not to be taken for granted.

P1030252 (2)They climb the hill, checking their altimeter, breathing heavily but otherwise comfortable, and stop once they’ve reached 100m.  From here they can see the Porters’ Lodge.  It is set apart from the other buildings – a long low corrugated-iron barn with no windows, but skylights in the roof.  It looks a lot like a cow shed.

Later they ask Angtu if Phurba is OK in the Porters’ Lodge.

Angtu:  He’s happy.  He says it’s not so full so there’s plenty of blankets for everyone.  And the kitchen is warm.  He’s found friends.  He’s been playing cards.

***

Back at their lodge, a woman reels into the dining room, looking confused and breathless.  After hovering in the centre of the room, she sits down at a table.

L:  Are you OK?

The woman speaks little English but says that her breathing is bad.  A Nepali man joins her.   He tells D&L he is the assistant guide of a group who left Lobuche this morning, heading for Everest Base Camp.  They had lunch here and left him behind with one member not feeling so well.  She needs to lose altitude – returning downhill is the simple remedy.  He suggests to her that they should walk back to Lobuche.  She refuses – she’ll be fine to get to Base Camp tomorrow.  The lodge owner appears with a bottle of oxygen.

Owner:  Would you like some?

Woman:  What is the cost?

Owner:  One hundred dollars an hour.

Woman:  Maybe 15 minutes.

She lies down on a bench.  Hours later she’s still on oxygen, her breathing now audible and laboured.  The assistant guide begs her to return to Lobuche.  She refuses.  The rest of her group get back from Base Camp.  The head guide informs her she needs to lose altitude.  He talks about a horse back to Lobuche.  She refuses – tomorrow she will get to Base Camp.  Her husband implores her.  The guide calls his boss in Kathmandu.  He insists that she leaves, for her own safety.  She refuses.  It gets dark.

In the evening she rallies, walks around, eats a little.  L smiles at her.

L:  How are you?

Woman.  Fine.  A little better.  Thank you.

She returns to her bench, lies down, coughs a lot, cries a little and goes back onto the oxygen.

After supper, D&L’s room is bitterly cold.  They pile three quilts on top of their sleeping bags.  Outside it is snowing and they fall asleep to the jingle of yak bells.

***

They are woken at 5am by noises from a nearby room.  There is a rapid and constant wheezing and rasping and moaning, interspersed by bouts of wracked coughing.  It is the woman and it sounds as though she now has full-blown pulmonary edema.  Her breathing is shallow.  Her lungs are filling with fluid.  If she’s not treated soon she could die.  She needs to lose a lot of altitude.  Now.   They lie there feeling helpless, and fretting.

L:  Should I go and sit with her?  Hold her hand?

D:  I can hear voices.  She’s with people.  She’s not alone.

For the last 12 hours she has been trapped by the darkness.  The helicopters fly by sight, and it’s now way too serious to potter back down to Lobuche on a horse.  She needs to be in hospital.  Urgently.  D&L twitch the curtain from time to time, listening to her terrible, laboured, painful breathing and waiting for the sky to lighten.  As soon as it does, a helicopter will come.  They lie and wait.  She pants and moans and coughs.  They wait and twitch the curtain.  She rasps and wheezes and coughs.   D checks the window.

D:  It’s getting light.

L:  Thank goodness.  The helicopter will come.  She’ll be rescued any minute.

D:  No.  She won’t.

L:  Why not?  Why would you say that?

D:  We’re in the cloud.  And it’s snowing.

L:  Oh no.

At breakfast, L frets and they watch the sky.  Angtu tells them the assistant guide sat with the woman all night, administering oxygen.  She’s in good hands.  She’s with her husband.  They are waiting for the heli.  There’s nothing more to do.

Angtu:  Some clients tell me they’d be happy to die in the Himalayas.

D:  But not before their time!

At this altitude, during the busy season there are medical evacuations almost daily.  There is a question of whether trekking itineraries are too fast to allow all members of a group to acclimatise.  With a medical evacuation there is money to be made by helicopter companies, private hospitals and tour operators.   However, putting all that aside, Nepali guides and tour operators tread a tricky line.  They have wealthy, demanding clients with high expectations who have paid a lot of money for an experience.  Culturally many of these clients will be much more comfortable with confrontation than the gentle courteous Nepalis, who are reluctant to deny their client the experience, or to argue with them.  The Nepalis may be the experts in their environment but a paying customer gets what a paying customer wants – right?  But the paying customer doesn’t necessarily know best – they’ve probably never had AMS before, and one of the symptoms is confusion – their judgement may well be impaired.   In this case, no-one benefits here from letting the client get their way, least of all the client themselves.  A client determined to ignore advice and their own physical symptoms, and subsequently becoming life-threateningly unwell, both puts themselves at risk and places a huge burden of responsibility on trekking companies, local guides and others with little or no medical expertise, such as a lodge owner who provides oxygen or a herder with a horse.  Not to mention the trauma and disruption inflicted on the rest of the trekking group.  Where to draw the line?  Who draws it?  And how to ensure it’s adhered to?   There are no easy answers.

It’s another three long hours before the sky lightens and the clouds lift reluctantly.  Eventually, D&L hear, and then see, a helicopter land at the edge of the village.  Finally the woman will be rescued.   They hope it’s not too late.

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